Controlled Accidents

Type: 
Workshop
Date and time: 
Saturday, April 25, 2015 -
1:00pm to 3:00pm
Scheduled Location: 
Boardroom A

Controlled Accidents is a term Alan M. Clark uses for his spontaneous image-generating painting techniques.  The unorthodox methods involve pushing paint around on a painting surface with rags, tin foil, balloons, sheets of plastic or plastic cylinders. The results are widely varied and suggest three dimensional shapes, sometimes nearly complete pictures.  Much as one might see faces in wood grain and figures in clouds, the shapes described by light and dark values of paint stimulate the imagination. 

In a Controlled Accident, an artist can find unexpected, bizarre subject matter.  The process of finding such subject matter, Clark calls Forced Hallucination.  What is found within the paint can be develop as part of a finished painting, or, in the case of a particularly successful Controlled Accident and Forced Hallucination endeavor, an entire painting might be discovered.  Similar techniques were used by such Surrealists as Max Ernst and Óscar Domínguez, to reveal subject matter from the subconscious. Clark will demonstrate both Controlled Accidents and Forced Hallucination in his demonstrations.

Alan M. Clark has created illustrations for hundreds of books, including works of fiction of various genre, nonfiction, textbooks, young adult fiction, and children’s books. Awards for his work include the World Fantasy Award and four Chesley Awards. He is the author of thirteen books, including seven novels, a lavishly illustrated novella, four collections of fiction, and a nonfiction full-color book of his artwork. Lazy Fascist Press released his latest Novel, The Door that Faced West. Mr. Clark's company, IFD Publishing, has released six traditional books and twenty-three ebooks by such authors as F. Paul Wilson, Elizabeth Engstrom, and Jeremy Robert Johnson. Alan M. Clark and his wife, Melody, live in Oregon. 

 

 

Attended these previous events

Previously attended:

Part of this event: